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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 228-235

Centralization and perceived control of COVID-19 during the pandemic: A cross-sectional study


1 Nigde Ömer Halisdemir University, Faculty of Medicine, Internal Medical Sciences, Department of Public Health, Nigde, Turkey
2 Selçuk University, Akşehir Kadir Yallagöz School of Health, Public Health Nursing Department, Konya, Turkey

Correspondence Address:
Çiğdem Samanci Tekin
Nigde Ömer Halisdemir University, Faculty of Medicine, Internal Medical Sciences, Department of Public Health, Nigde
Turkey
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2221-6189.362814

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Objective: To uncover the impact of centralization of COVID-19 and perceived control of COVID-19 on society during the pandemic. Methods: We recruited a total of 1 041 people in this cross-sectional study. The data were collected using a questionnaire booklet covering demographics, a COVID-19-related information form, the Centrality of Event Scale, and the Perception of Control of COVID-19 Scale. We utilized independent samples t-test, chi-square test, and one-way analysis of variance to analyze the data. Results: 1041 questionnaires were collected and no questionnaire were excluded from our study. Slightly more than half of the participants (51.2%) stated that social isolation impaired public mental health, while 30.1% reported adverse impacts of the pandemic on their sleep quality. Participants with changes to their sleep patterns were found to centralize COVID-19 more. Moreover, measures against COVID-19 and constant announcements of the daily number of cases in the media brought both positive and negative effects on people and further contributed to the participants’ centralization of COVID-19. Individuals with low centralization scores were concluded to perceive COVID-19 as a minor disease. Healthcare professionals without a relative diagnosed with COVID-19 and those satisfied with treatment opportunities had a higher perceived control of COVID-19, while those who were not interested in statistical data on COVID-19 and who had difficulty complying with the rules had a lower perceived control of COVID-19. Besides, poorer perceived control of COVID-19 was found to adversely affect sleep quality. Furthermore, healthcare professionals scored higher on the inevitability subscale of the Perception of Control of COVID-19 Scale. Finally, among the participants, most COVID-19 survivors thought COVID-19 to be an avoidable disease. Conclusion: In addition to its physical impacts, COVID-19 adversely impacts on mental health, and these effects are closely linked to a society’s centralization of COVID-19 and perceived control of COVID-19.


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